Who wants to represent and serve us ?

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Defend our lands and water, Defend our 7th Generations, and Defend our treaty rights

Vote for candidates who will!

District 2B

Two candidates are vying to represent us: Steve Green and Karen Branden.

The Park Rapids League of Women Voters held a non partisan meeting with Representative Steve Green. Here are some of his responses to questions from the audience:

On Environmental Regulations:

Steve Green is a primary supporter of Line 3.  Green was the chief author of a bill which eliminates the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency's and Department of Natural Resources' rule-making authority. Instead, he proposed that House and Senate committees would have jurisdiction over environment and natural resources. His bill failed.

On Water Quality: 

“A lot of you people out there think I'm anti-clean water. Believe me, I'm not," Green said, adding that his research finds water quality is greatly improving. “….Water cleans itself. We don't go in and put anything in to clean it. What we do is stop polluting it and it actually cleans itself," Green said.

According to Steve Green, “Renewable energy manufacturing doesn't work in Minnesota or North Dakota. Wind farms can't produce to their full capacity and "solar is even worse.” 

Here on the White Earth reservation, we are about to build a solar thermal panel manufacturing facility, and, the iron range is now producing solar panels.  We think that’s the future.

Legacy Funding: 

Steve Green has proposed that Legacy Funding be moved to improve roads and infrastructure. Green opposed the use of Legacy Funding to support the return of land to the White Earth tribe.

His opponent:

Karen Branden, has been involved in education work, and this is her first time running for office. A long time Becker County resident, she has been involved in the White Earth Tribal College and Niijii Radio, amongst other projects.  Karen supports local quality childcare, solid funding for education social services and more local organic agriculture.  Karen Branden is a supporter of renewable energy, her house is solar powered, and her l959 VW van is now electric. Karen has stated public support for tribal sovereignty.

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Statewide

state Attorney general

Keith Ellison has served in Congress for 12 years, championing consumer, worker and civil rights protections. He worked 16 years as a trial attorney and oversaw the Legal Rights Center for low-income clients. Says he wants to be attorney general because working families need a fighter, and would work to make health care more affordable, ensure a fair economy, defend equal rights, and uphold the Constitution.

Doug Wardlow earned a law degree from Georgetown University and clerked for the Minnesota Supreme Court. He worked against China’s practice of dumping steel. He wants to make Minnesota fair and safe, rebuild the AG’s criminal division, combat opioids and human trafficking, and protect against financial scams and fraud. Says he would fight illegal regulations that hurt job creators, farmers and laborers. Those regulations include protection for the environment and workers. 

The Governor’s Race

On the statewide level, gubernatorial elections include two candidates- Jeff Johnson and Tim Walz.  Johnson is from Detroit Lakes.  Both support mining and pipelines, big concerns to Native people.  Johnson is not set his position support of tribal sovereignty.

Walz has been a supporter of tribal sovereignty although he is in favor of Line 3, and mining.  His running mate is Peggy Flanagan, White Earth enrollee, who has been very active in supporting Native people at the state legislature.

June 2, 1924 , Congress granted citizenship to all Native Americans born in the  U.S.  Yet even after the Indian Citizenship Act, some Native Americans weren't allowed to vote because the right to vote was governed by  state law .  Yes, Native Americans were given the right to vote in the Voting Rights Act of 1965; before that time different states disallowed them to vote for different reasons.  Until 1957, some states barred Native Americans from voting. Let’s Pow Wow the Vote … Be part of history.

June 2, 1924, Congress granted citizenship to all Native Americans born in the U.S. Yet even after the Indian Citizenship Act, some Native Americans weren't allowed to vote because the right to vote was governed by state law. Yes, Native Americans were given the right to vote in the Voting Rights Act of 1965; before that time different states disallowed them to vote for different reasons. Until 1957, some states barred Native Americans from voting. Let’s Pow Wow the Vote … Be part of history.

YOUR VOICE

YOU DECIDE WHO YOU WANT TO REPRESENT AND SERVE YOU WITH YOUR VOTE. VOTE FOR THE 7TH GENERATIONS!