POWWOW THE VOTE MN
POWWOW THE VOTE MN
Defend our lands, water and treaty rights: elect leaders who will
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Our Vote Our Voice

 
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Early Voting

ABSENTEE VOTING OR VOTE BY MAIL OPTIONS

To vote by mail, apply to have an absentee ballot mailed to you. You do not need to be registered to apply.

Vote Early in Person

Can vote early with an absentee ballot at your local elections office. If you are not registered, you can do so in person if you show proof of residence.

GENERAL ELECTION

  • First day to vote early in person: Friday, September 21

  • Last day to vote early in person: Monday, November 5

Locations

All voters have at least one location where they can vote early in person with an absentee ballot. Depending on where you live, there may be additional locations.

  1. You can vote in person at your county election office.

  2. In addition to your county election office, some cities and towns offer in-person absentee voting. Check with your city clerk's office for more information.

  3. Some local jurisdictions may provide additional absentee voting days or hours beyond the above required days and times. Call your jurisdiction for more information.

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Need Help?

Call 1-877-600-VOTE (8683)

REGISTER ON PAPER

Where to return your application

Mail or drop off your application to either your county election office, or mail to:

Secretary of State 
60 Empire Dr., Suite 100
Saint Paul, MN 55103

county election office hours

For most elections, absentee voting locations must be open during their normal business hours starting 46 days before the election.

  • The last Saturday before Election Day (10 a.m. — 3 p.m.)

  • The day before Election Day until 5 p.m.

  • This does not apply to school districts holding standalone elections. 


Register to Vote Early In Person

Online Registration

The deadline to register in advance online is 1:59 p.m. on Tuesday, October 16 for the General Election. Paper applications must be received by 5 p.m. on Tuesday, October 16. 

(or Update Your Registration - click here)

REGISTRATION DATES

Registration temporarily closes 20 days before the election, and opens again on Election Day for voters who register at their polling place.

You can vote early with an absentee ballot at your local elections office. If you are not registered, you can do so in person if you show proof of residence.

Locations

All voters have at least one location where they can vote early in person with an absentee ballot. Depending on where you live, there may be additional locations.

  1. You can vote in person at your county election office.

  2. In addition to your county election office, some cities and towns offer in-person absentee voting. Check with your city clerk's office for more information.

Need Help?

Call 1-877-600-VOTE (8683)

2018 Early Voting Dates

GENERAL ELECTION

  • First day to vote early in person: Friday, September 21

  • Last day to vote early in person: Monday, November 5

    Hours

    For most elections, absentee voting locations must be open during their normal business hours starting 46 days before the election. In addition, locations offering absentee ballots for federal, state or county elections must be open:

    • The last Saturday before Election Day (10 a.m. — 3 p.m.)

    • The day before Election Day until 5 p.m.


Register to Vote on Election Day

REGISTER ON ELECTION DAY

To register at your polling place on Election Day, bring one proof of residence listed below.

1 ID with current name and address

  • Valid Minnesota driver’s license, learner’s permit or ID; or a receipt for any of these.

  • Tribal ID with name, address, photo and signature.

2 Approved documents

Can be shown on electronic device.

  • Bill, account or start-of-service statement due or dated within 30 days of the election for:

    • Phone, TV or internet, Solid waste, sewer, electric, gas or water, Banking or credit card, Rent or mortgage.

  • Residential lease or rent agreement valid through Election Day or Current student fee statement


Voter Rights - Registering to Vote

Who can vote in Minnesota. You must be:

You can vote while under guardianship unless a judge specifically has revoked your right to vote.


Vital Questions

I HAVE A CRIMINAL RECORD

Your criminal record does not affect your right to vote in Minnesota unless you are currently serving a felony conviction sentence, including probation, parole or supervised release.

Voting after a felony conviction

You can vote after you finish all parts of your sentence, including any probation, parole, or supervised release.

As soon as you finish (once you are ‘off-paper’), you can vote. You will need to register to vote. It is best to register before Election Day, but it is not required. 

Print a factsheet on this topic

Download Voting with a Criminal Record factsheet.


I'M IN A RESIDENTIAL FACILITY

If you live in a residential facility and you need to register to vote, you can register onlineon paper, or a staff person can go with you to the polling place to confirm your address.

What is a residential facility?

Residential facilities include:

  • Assisted-living facilities

  • Battered women’s shelters

  • Group residential housing

  • Homeless shelters

  • Nursing homes

  • Residential alcohol and chemical treatment programs

  • Residential facilities for persons with developmental disabilities

  • Supervised-living facilities

  • Transitional housing

  • Veterans’ homes

Need Help?

Call 1-877-600-VOTE (8683)

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Need Help?

Call 1-877-600-VOTE (8683)

VOTING DAY POLL HOURS

State and federal elections 7 a.m. - 8 p.m.

In state and federal elections, towns with less than 500 registered voters are not required to open until 10 a.m. but most choose to open at 7 a.m.

Need to register on Election Day?

Need Help?

Call 1-877-600-VOTE (8683)

VOTING DAY POLL HOURS

State and federal elections 7 a.m. - 8 p.m.

In state and federal elections, towns with less than 500 registered voters are not required to open until 10 a.m. but most choose to open at 7 a.m.


Need to register on Election Day?

In Minnesota, you can register or update your registration at your polling place on Election Day. Find out what you'll need to bring with you.

Download Election Day Registration factsheet.


I’M LIVING TEMPORARILY IN MINNESOTA

You cannot vote in Minnesota if you are only living here temporarily. However, you can still vote in your home state’s election with an absentee ballot. 

To learn how to vote in your home state, visit Can I Vote? from the National Association of Secretaries of State.


As a voter in Minnesota, you have many rights

Know your rights

  • Have Time off work to vote

  • You have a right to take time off work to vote without losing your pay, personal leave, or vacation time.

  • Vote if in line by 8 p.m. You have the right to vote if you are in line to vote anytime before 8 p.m.

  • Register on Election day: You have the right to register to vote on Election Day if you can show the required

  • Sign in orally: You have the right to orally confirm who you are and to ask another person to sign for you if you cannot sign your name. Ask for help

  • You have the right to ask anyone for help, except for an agent of your employer or union, or a candidate.

  • Bring children to the polls: You have the right to bring your children with you to vote.

  • You have the right to vote without anyone in the polling place trying to influence your vote.

  • Get a replacement ballot: You have the right to a replacement ballot if you make a mistake on your ballot before you cast it.


Where to Vote?

 

THIS IS BECKER + CLEARWATER + MAHNOMEN COUNTIES COVERING

WHITE EARTH

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The blue star “yes,” is the County Election Locations where you can vote early or absentee (mail):

Registration temporarily closes 20 days before the election, and opens again on Election Day for voters who register at their polling place.

The red icon “no,” is the voting poll locations only

Register to Vote Early

WHERE TO RETURN YOUR APPLICATION:

Mail or drop off your application to either your county election office, or to: Secretary of State, 60 Empire Dr., Suite 100
Saint Paul, MN 55103

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Pine Point Route - Becker County:

  1. Leave Chief’s Store on Pow Wow Hwy to the Ice Cracking on Hwy 35.

  2. Hwy 35 to Hwy 143 at Strawberry Lake Store on Hwy 34 to White Earth.

  3. White Earth to Ogema to Hwy 59 into Callaway to take you to Becker County in Detroit Lakes.

Rice Lake Route - Mahnomen County:

  1. Roy Lake Store to Auginash Road to Rice Lake Community Center to the Mahnomen Courthouse.

  2. Naytahwaush Community Charter School County Road 4 to Hwy 200 to the Mahnomen Courthouse.

REZ UBER

VOTE EARLY!

Ride to County Election Offices of Becker, Mahnomen and Clearwater Counties

Hours will be 10AM-2PM - Two Routes a day

Becker County Route Days

  • Pine Point Starts Oct. 17th (Mon + Wed)

    • Fri., Oct 26th + Mon, Oct 29th + Wed., Oct. 31st + Fri. Nov. 2nd + Monday Nov. 5th

  • If we are able to cover Becker on Nov. 3rd, we will make our rounds but will be in Mahnomen County this day. However, County Offices are Open Sat. Nov. 3rd before Election Day to Vote Early.

ElECTION DAY November 6th we will be crossing through Pine Point into White Earth to Becker County all Day.

Mahnomen County Route Days

  • Rice Lake Starts Oct. 18th (Tues + Thurs)

    • Tues., Oct 30th + Thurs., Nov. 1st + Sat., Nov 3rd

  • County Offices are Open Sat. Nov. 3rd before Election Day to Vote Early.

  • We will visit facilities, nursing homes, community centers, or residential if you call us to schedule it. All has the right and opportunity to ride the Rez Uber and vote.

Clearwater County is call in for schedule

If you think you missed us, call or text us … !! We will be visiting local villages and we will be pretty much hard to miss!

We will have beverages, and light foods for your long trips to the Election Offices so we will have you covered. We look forward to marking history with you as we Pow Wow the Native Vote!

Rez Uber isn’t set up for disability but our Rez Uber team can help mobilize as much as possible.

Who wants to represent and serve us ?

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Defend our lands and water, Defend our 7th Generations, and Defend our treaty rights

Vote for candidates who will!

District 2B

Two candidates are vying to represent us: Steve Green and Karen Branden.

The Park Rapids League of Women Voters held a non partisan meeting with Representative Steve Green. Here are some of his responses to questions from the audience:

On Environmental Regulations:

Steve Green is a primary supporter of Line 3.  Green was the chief author of a bill which eliminates the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency's and Department of Natural Resources' rule-making authority. Instead, he proposed that House and Senate committees would have jurisdiction over environment and natural resources. His bill failed.

On Water Quality: 

“A lot of you people out there think I'm anti-clean water. Believe me, I'm not," Green said, adding that his research finds water quality is greatly improving. “….Water cleans itself. We don't go in and put anything in to clean it. What we do is stop polluting it and it actually cleans itself," Green said.

According to Steve Green, “Renewable energy manufacturing doesn't work in Minnesota or North Dakota. Wind farms can't produce to their full capacity and "solar is even worse.” 

Here on the White Earth reservation, we are about to build a solar thermal panel manufacturing facility, and, the iron range is now producing solar panels.  We think that’s the future.

Legacy Funding: 

Steve Green has proposed that Legacy Funding be moved to improve roads and infrastructure. Green opposed the use of Legacy Funding to support the return of land to the White Earth tribe.

His opponent:

Karen Branden, has been involved in education work, and this is her first time running for office. A long time Becker County resident, she has been involved in the White Earth Tribal College and Niijii Radio, amongst other projects.  Karen supports local quality childcare, solid funding for education social services and more local organic agriculture.  Karen Branden is a supporter of renewable energy, her house is solar powered, and her l959 VW van is now electric. Karen has stated public support for tribal sovereignty.

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Statewide

state Attorney general

Keith Ellison has served in Congress for 12 years, championing consumer, worker and civil rights protections. He worked 16 years as a trial attorney and oversaw the Legal Rights Center for low-income clients. Says he wants to be attorney general because working families need a fighter, and would work to make health care more affordable, ensure a fair economy, defend equal rights, and uphold the Constitution.

Doug Wardlow earned a law degree from Georgetown University and clerked for the Minnesota Supreme Court. He worked against China’s practice of dumping steel. He wants to make Minnesota fair and safe, rebuild the AG’s criminal division, combat opioids and human trafficking, and protect against financial scams and fraud. Says he would fight illegal regulations that hurt job creators, farmers and laborers. Those regulations include protection for the environment and workers. 

The Governor’s Race

On the statewide level, gubernatorial elections include two candidates- Jeff Johnson and Tim Walz.  Johnson is from Detroit Lakes.  Both support mining and pipelines, big concerns to Native people.  Johnson is not set his position support of tribal sovereignty.

Walz has been a supporter of tribal sovereignty although he is in favor of Line 3, and mining.  His running mate is Peggy Flanagan, White Earth enrollee, who has been very active in supporting Native people at the state legislature.

June 2, 1924 , Congress granted citizenship to all Native Americans born in the  U.S.  Yet even after the Indian Citizenship Act, some Native Americans weren't allowed to vote because the right to vote was governed by  state law .  Yes, Native Americans were given the right to vote in the Voting Rights Act of 1965; before that time different states disallowed them to vote for different reasons.  Until 1957, some states barred Native Americans from voting. Let’s Pow Wow the Vote … Be part of history.

June 2, 1924, Congress granted citizenship to all Native Americans born in the U.S. Yet even after the Indian Citizenship Act, some Native Americans weren't allowed to vote because the right to vote was governed by state law. Yes, Native Americans were given the right to vote in the Voting Rights Act of 1965; before that time different states disallowed them to vote for different reasons. Until 1957, some states barred Native Americans from voting. Let’s Pow Wow the Vote … Be part of history.

YOUR VOICE

YOU DECIDE WHO YOU WANT TO REPRESENT AND SERVE YOU WITH YOUR VOTE. VOTE FOR THE 7TH GENERATIONS!